Valhalla

All good intentions seem to lead down the road to hell.  Or at least Valhalla.

Friends of mine went and did a thing, so I will be taking a short hiatus from my 16th Century costuming to work on their very period Norse stuff.  They have visions, I get to make them reality!

I hear all the time about how easy rectangular construction is… this is embellished truth.  I also hear about how viking’s are all the same …. an outright lie.  Or how “its all about the embroidery and jewelry”… whoever said that didn’t have 4 weeks to turn around full outfits!  I find rectangular construction just as challenging as fitted garments.  Mostly I psyche myself out thinking they are so easy and make stupid little mistakes.  We will get to those later.

As mentioned, 4 weeks to turn around the following:

Viking Womans undergown – White Linen
Viking Mans undertunic w/ side collar closure – White Linen
Viking Womans gown embllishments – Yellow Linen
Viking apron dress – Red Linen
Viking coat – Red Linen

Inga’s undergown pattern, including incorrect body measurement

I started with patterns, since neither had a good pattern that fit.  I took a few existing garments and pulled measurements.  **Note** When taking a pattern, make sure you’re measuring often and on flat surfaces.  Measure again before cutting.  I measured and then cut the body of the womans gown too small and it had to be remade…  Why do I find body blocks and fitted patterns so much easier!

Arnsbjorn’s shirt pattern.  Sans underarm gussets.

I wish I could say there was 3 dimensional measuring and math involved, but there really wasn’t.  Just a measuring tape and a flat surface, pencil and paper.  Once I had the measurements rough sketched, I plotted them on graph paper and started cutting.

All seams were assembled by machine, and finished in either a pressed flat open seam or run and fell seam, whipstitched down.  I am particularly proud of how my gores and gussets went in.

Inset gore at front of Inga’s gown.

Keep an eye on this space for a tutorial on how to inset gores without the help of a convenient seam.